Amanda Oakley’s teledermy research is improving outcomes for skin cancer patients.

Our need for dermatology services outweighs our supply of dermatologists, meaning the gap between a GP visit and specialist appointment can be a long, nervous wait for someone with a suspicious skin lesion. Dr Amanda Oakley is exploring the use of technology to shorten the queue. Her earlier work in this area resulted in the establishment of Virtual Lesion Clinics, where digital images of potential skin cancers are taken for subsequent analysis by a dermatologist. Now Dr Oakley is encouraging GPs to use dermatoscopes to capture images and send them directly to a specialist using their mobile phones. She expects the research to improve the diagnosis of melanoma, reduce unnecessary excisions of benign lesions, and contribute to faster, more convenient treatment.

Adjunct Associate Professor Amanda Oakley

University of Auckland, WDHB

2017 Waikato District Health Board Medical Science Award Finalist

Amanda Oakley’s teledermy research is improving outcomes for skin cancer patients.

Our need for dermatology services outweighs our supply of dermatologists, meaning the gap between a GP visit and specialist appointment can be a long, nervous wait for someone with a suspicious skin lesion. Dr Amanda Oakley is exploring the use of technology to shorten the queue. Her earlier work in this area resulted in the establishment of Virtual Lesion Clinics, where digital images of potential skin cancers are taken for subsequent analysis by a dermatologist. Now Dr Oakley is encouraging GPs to use dermatoscopes to capture images and send them directly to a specialist using their mobile phones. She expects the research to improve the diagnosis of melanoma, reduce unnecessary excisions of benign lesions, and contribute to faster, more convenient treatment.